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Implications of the new FAA rules

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently announced its first official rules for commercial use of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or drones, as the rest of the world calls them. These guidelines were created to ensure safety between drones and other aircraft. The new rules, known as Part 107, also simplify the requirements businesses have to follow
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