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Omnidirectional mobile robot has just 2 moving parts

(Carnegie Mellon University) More than a decade ago, Carnegie Mellon University's Ralph Hollis invented the ballbot, an elegantly simple robot whose tall, thin body glides atop a sphere slightly smaller than a bowling ball. The latest version, called SIMbot, has an equally elegant motor with just one moving part: the ball. The spherical induction motor (SIM) eliminates the mechanical drive systems of previous ballbots.
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More than a decade ago, Ralph Hollis invented the ballbot, an elegantly simple robot whose tall, thin body glides atop a sphere slightly smaller than a bowling ball. The latest version, called SIMbot, has an equally elegant motor wi...

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