Post Profile






Study solves 50-year-old puzzle tied to enigmatic, lone wolf waves

(University at Buffalo) Solitary waves called solitons are one of nature's great curiosities: unlike other waves, these lone wolf waves keep their energy and shape as they travel, instead of dissipating or dispersing as most other waves do. In a new paper in Physics Review Letters, a team of mathematicians, physicists and engineers tackles a famous, 50-year-old problem tied to these enigmatic entities.
read more

share

Related Posts


Peregrine soliton may explain ocean's rogue waves

Technology / Technology Industry News : Ars Technica

Researchers have finally observed a special type of wave that has eluded experiments for almost 25 years. The Peregrine soliton, a special type of large wave that can retain its size and shape while traveling at a constant speed, ha...

Deceptive-looking vortex line in superfluid led to twice-mistaken identity

Academics / General Science : ScienceDaily: Science Society

Researchers have shown that a group of scientists were incorrect when they concluded that a mysterious effect found in superfluids indicated the presence of solitons—exotic, solitary waves. Instead, they explain, the result was due ...

Early universe may have been dominated by bobbing waves

Academics / General Science : Physorg: Other Sciences

(Phys.org) -- Localized waves that bob up and down without dissipating their energy, called ?oscillons,? may have dominated the early universe shortly after inflation. A collaboration of physicists from MIT, Yale University, and Sta...

New breed of optical soliton wave discovered

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Applied scientists led by Caltech's Kerry Vahala have discovered a new type of optical soliton wave that travels in the wake of other soliton waves, hitching a ride on and feeding off of the energy of the other wave. read more

Study Solves 50-Year-Old Puzzle Tied to Enigmatic, Lone Wolf Waves

Health : Newswise Medical News

Solitary waves called solitons are one of nature's great curiosities. In a new paper in Physical Review Letters (PRL), a team of mathematicians, physicists and engineers tackles a famous, 50-year-old problem tied to these enigmatic ...

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC