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Who will win the Nobel Prize in Economics this coming Monday?

I’ve never once nailed the timing, but I have two predictions. The first is William Baumol, who is I believe ninety-four years old.  His cost-disease hypothesis is very important for understanding the productivity slowdown, see this recent empirical update.  Oddly, the hypothesis is most likely false for the sector where Baumol pushed it hardest — […] The post Who will win the Nobel Prize in Economics this coming Monday? appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.
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Tyler Cowen: I’ve never once nailed the timing, but I have two predictions. The first is William Baumol, who is I believe ninety-four years old. His cost-disease hypothesis is very important for understanding the productivity slowdo...

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