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Want to slake your thirst the scientific way? Drink this kind of beverage, says new study

Naturally the logical thing to do when you're thirsty is to have something to drink, but some drinks are more thirst-quenching than others, according to new research from the Monell Center... Continue Reading Want to slake your thirst the scientific way? Drink this kind of beverage, says new study Category: Good Thinking Tags: Sensory Drink Related Articles: Small-brained elephantnose fish can think big like humans Scientists replace amputee's hand.
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