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26 jaguars killed in Panama so far this year

(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A combination of camera-trapping studies and interviews reveals that 26 jaguars have been killed this year in the tiny Republic of Panama. Panama connects North and South America and is an important bridge for wildlife and migrating birds.
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