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Researchers discover an unusual attractant structure in a 54-million-year-old biting midge

"Old" doesn't always have to mean "primitive": paleontologists at the University of Bonn have discovered a tiny biting midge no larger than one millimeter in 54 million-year-old amber. The insect possesses a vesicular structure at the front edge of the wings. The researchers assume that these "pockets" were used by the female midge to collect store and spray disseminate pheromones in an unusually efficient way in order to attract sexual partnersmales.
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(University of Bonn) Paleontologists at the University of Bonn have discovered a tiny biting midge no larger than one millimeter in 54-million-year-old amber. The insect possesses a vesicular structure at the front edge of the wings...

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