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Penn study: Today's most successful fish weren't always evolutionary standouts

(University of Pennsylvania) A new analysis of more than a thousand fossil fishes from nearly 500 species led by the University of Pennsylvania's John Clarke revealed that the success story of teleosts, a dominating group of fish, is not as straightforward as once believed.
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