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How do birds dive safely at high speeds? New research explains.

(Virginia Tech) Some species of seabirds plunge-dive at speeds greater than 50 miles per hour to surprise their prey. In the first study on the biomechanics of this diving behavior, researchers show how the birds pull of this feat safely.
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