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Chicken korma, Eton mess and a genetic variant provide clues to our food choices

People who carry variants in a particular gene have an increased preference for high fat food, but a decreased preference for sugary foods, according to a new study. The research has provided insights into why we make particular food choices, with potential implications for our understanding of obesity. This is one of the first studies to show a direct link between food preference and specific genetic variants in humans.
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