Post Profile






How cells take out the trash—phosphoarginine deciphered

Cells never forget to take out the trash. It has long been known that cells tag proteins for degradation by labelling them with ubiquitin, a signal described as "the molecular kiss of death". Tim Clausen's group at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna identified an analogous system in gram-positive bacteria, where the role of a degradation tag is fulfilled by a little known post-translational modification: arginine phosphorylation.
read more

share

Related Posts


Researcher Finds Pathway Driving Cancer Signals: Protein May Represent A Switch To Turn Off B Cell Lymphoma

Health : Medical News Today

Researchers studying the molecular signals that drive a specific type of lymphoma have discovered a key biological pathway leading to this type of cancer. Cancerous cells have been described as being "addicted" to certain oncogenes ...

Signal transduction in cells: Researchers describe new model for regulation

Academics / General Science : ScienceDaily: Science Society

The cellular activity of the enzyme ROCK is controlled by a ‘molecular ruler,’ new research shows. ROCK is a protein kinase. These enzymes transmit signals and regulate complex processes in cells. These findings represent a complete...

Light signals from living cells

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

FRANKFURT Tracing distinct proteins in cells is like looking for a needle in a haystack. In order to localize proteins and decipher their function in living cells, researchers label them with fluorescent molecules. However, the deli...

Disturbance wanted

Health : EurekAlert: Health

(Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Some anticancer agents intend to disturb the function of the p97 protein complex, which is essential for survival of cancer cells. A team of researchers of th...

New study uncovers how brain cells degrade dangerous protein aggregates

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute (BSI) have discovered a key mechanism responsible for selectively degrading aggregates of ubiquitinated proteins from the cell. Their findings indicate that the capture and removal of...

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC