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American workers prefer set work schedules, but would take wage cuts to work from home

(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) A new study by Princeton University and Harvard University, the average American worker is indifferent to flexible work schedules and instead prefers a set 40-hour workweek. It comes down to pay: Most workers, men and women, aren't willing to take even a small pay cut to set their own schedules.
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