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The watery cohort of constellation Pegasus

The constellation of Pegasus dominates the southern sky, with its neighbouring watery constellations Capricornus, Aquarius, Pisces, Cetus and Piscis Austrinus Mars, the best placed of our three bright evening planets, stands low in Britain’s S sky in the early evening while Venus is brilliant but sets in the SW less than one hour after sunset. Saturn lies between them at present and is due to be passed by Venus on the 30th.
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