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MIT’s new software makes multi-material 3D printing easy

Using a mixture of different materials in 3D printing has been difficult for the user end, requiring basically a knowledge of programming and specific training, but new software developed by MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab aims to be the “Photoshop for 3D materials,” making it accessible to basically anyone. The “Foundry” system developed… Read More
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