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Synchronizing optical clocks to one quadrillionth of a second

(American Institute of Physics) An international team of researchers, led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, has advanced their work with synchronizing a remote optical clock with a master clock by exploring what happens to time signals that travel through 12 kilometers (km) of turbulent air. As the team reports in Applied Physics Letters, they were able to demonstrate real-time, femtosecond-level clock synchronization across a low-lying, strongly turbulent, 12-km horizontal air path by optical two-way time transfer.
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