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Unconventional cell division in the Caribbean Sea

Most bacteria divide by placing a protein called FtsZ at the division site. Traditionally, it was thought that FtsZ must organize into a ring in order to recruit a dozen of other proteins and together with them exert an homogeneous and simultaneous constricting force pinching the bacterium from side to side. Just as when one tries to squeeze a rod-shaped air-balloon with a thumb and a ring finger.
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