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Researcher leads worldwide effort to build largest-ever database monitoring temperatures of intertidal systems

In a promising step forward in the study of how climate change affects biodiversity, a group of 48 researchers led by Northeastern's Brian Helmuth, has created the largest-ever database recording temperature conditions from the viewpoint of a nonhuman organism. The database, housed in Northeastern's Marine Science Center, will enable scientists to pinpoint areas of unusual warming, intervene to help curb damage to vital marine ecosystems, and develop strategies that could prevent extinction of certain species.
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