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Latino teens who care for others reap academic benefits

(University of Missouri-Columbia) A new study from the University of Missouri, found that Mexican-American youth who exhibit more prosocial behaviors, such as empathy and caring toward others, are more likely to demonstrate better academic performance later in adolescence. These findings provide guidance to parents as well as clues for developing early intervention and policy programs designed to improve academic performance.
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