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Soybean nitrogen breakthrough could help feed the world

(Washington State University) Washington State University biologist Mechthild Tegeder has developed a way to dramatically increase the yield and quality of soybeans. Her greenhouse-grown soybean plants fix twice as much nitrogen from the atmosphere as their natural counterparts, grow larger and produce up to 36 percent more seeds.
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Washington State University biologist Mechthild Tegeder has developed a way to dramatically increase the yield and quality of soybeans.

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