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Silver nanoparticle concentration too low to be harmful in water supply, paper finds

(University of Missouri-Columbia) Silver nanoparticles have a wide array of uses, one of which is to treat drinking water for harmful bacteria and viruses. But do silver nanoparticles also kill off potentially beneficial bacteria or cause other harmful effects to water-based ecosystems? A new paper from a team of University of Missouri College of Engineering researchers says that's not the case.
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