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Biologists use genomics to identify evolving new bird species in southern Idaho

The South Hills crossbill, potentially a newly discovered species of finch, has evolved over the past 6,000 years with a unique dependence on its food source, the Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine, in a coevolutionary arms race that also changed the tree, according to a genomic study led by Tom Parchman, a biologist at the University of Nevada, Reno.
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