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CFPB Looks Here to Stay: What Does the Future Hold?

A decision by the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals overturning the CFPB director structure allows the agency to pursue its ongoing policy and enforcement agenda. With separate new regulations on payday lending and mandatory arbitration expected soon, will consumers finally get the more effective financial product regulation we deserve?
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