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“Marginally Significant Effects as Evidence for Hypotheses: Changing Attitudes Over Four Decades”

Kevin Lewis sends along this article by Laura Pritschet, Derek Powell, and Zachary Horne, who write: Some effects are statistically significant. Other effects do not reach the threshold of statistical significance and are sometimes described as “marginally significant” or as “approaching significance.” Although the concept of marginal significance is widely deployed in academic psychology, there […] The post “Marginally Significant Effects as Evidence for Hypotheses: Changing Attitudes Over Four Decades” appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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