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Is it Possible to Vaccinate a Baby Without Actually Vaccinating the Baby?

While it has long been known that breastfeeding provides infants with immunity protection, science couldn’t really give a definitive answer on how the “passive immunity” process works. A University of California Riverside study may provide some answers. Yet it may also spark more questions. For example, is it possible to vaccinate a baby without actually and actively vaccinating the baby themselves? And if so, when should this practice be exercised? The post Is it Possible to Vaccinate a Baby Without Actually Vaccinating the Baby? appeared first on Growing Your Baby.
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