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Rise of the Reactionary

A distrust of high theory used to be a mainstay of conservatism. Edmund Burke, scrutinizing support for the French Revolution, had seen connections with sinister “literary caballers, and intriguing philosophers, with political theologians and theological politicians.” Even in the middle of the past century, when American intellectuals on the right were publishing the books that buttressed a movement—Peter Viereck’s “Conservatism Revisited” (1949), Whittaker Chambers’s “Witness” (1952), and Russell Kirk’s “The Conservative Mind” (1953)—a shared aversion to grand philosophizing was palpable.
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Book club

Politics / US Politics : Balloon Juice

I have settled on Corey Robin’s “The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Sarah Palin” for our next book club. I am about halfway through and I’ve learned a lot already. I spoke with Corey and he will be happy to join...

Reminder

Politics / US Politics : Balloon Juice

Tomorrow at 8 pm eastern time, we’ll be discussing the first chapter of “The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Sarah Palin” by Corey Robin. Here’s an interview with Corey Robin about the book at Naked Capitalism.

Soon it comes ’round to your soul

Politics / US Politics : Balloon Juice

So we’re on for a discussion with Corey Robin about his book “The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Sarah Palin” next Wednesday (January 11) at 8. I’m excited! I highly recommend the book to all of you. One thing I...

Understanding the conservative mind, without brain scans

Academics / Philosophy : Rationally Speaking

by Massimo Pigliucci Is Nietzsche to be found somewhere between Ayn Rand and Antonin Scalia? This is just one of a series of intriguing claims I am encountering while reading The Reactionary Mind : Conservatism from Edmund Burke to ...

In Search Of Edmund Burke

Politics : The Daily Dish By Andrew Sullivan

Claimed by both the right (he stood against the French Revolution) and the left (he was a sage skeptic of colonialism), Edmund Burke tends to get lost amidst competing partisan appropriations of his legacy. Was there a unifying core...

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