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The Surprising Success of Halloween Pop-Up Stores

A version of this post originally appeared on Tedium, a twice-weekly newsletter that hunts for the end of the long tail. “I didn’t invent temporary sales. But I feel like I invented temporary Halloween.” In the early 1980s, Joseph Marver had a problem. The San Francisco-based dress retailer couldn’t for the life of him convince anyone to buy his dresses. But he did see that many of his potential customers were passing up his store to go to a nearby costume shop.
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