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Tiny crystals and nanowires could join forces to split water

(University at Buffalo) Scientists are pursuing a tiny solution for harnessing one of the world's most abundant sources of clean energy: water. By marrying teeny crystals called quantum dots to miniature wires, the researchers are developing materials that show promise for splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen fuel, which could be used to power cars, buses, boats and other modes of transportation.
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