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UMD biologists first to observe direct inheritance of gene-silencing RNA

(University of Maryland) Developmental biologists at the University of Maryland are the first to observe molecules of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) -- a close cousin of DNA that can silence genes within cells -- being passed directly from parent to offspring in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. Importantly, the gene silencing effect created by dsRNA molecules in parents also persisted in their offspring.
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