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Soil moisture, snowpack data could help predict 'flash droughts'

(National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research) New research suggests that 'flash droughts' -- like the one that unexpectedly gripped the Southern Rockies and Midwest in the summer of 2012 -- could be predicted months in advance using soil moisture and snowpack data.
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Soil moisture, snowpack data could help predict 'flash droughts'

Issues & Causes / Environmentalism : Physorg: Earth

New research suggests that "flash droughts"—like the one that unexpectedly gripped the Southern Rockies and Midwest in the summer of 2012—could be predicted months in advance using soil moisture and snowpack data.

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