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How Bats Ping On the Wing—And Look Cute Doing It

Researchers reveal how bats turn echolocation signals into a 3-D image of moving prey
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'Non-echolocating' fruit bats actually do echolocate, with wing clicks

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

The findings are interesting in light of earlier suggestions that echolocation may have evolved initially for bats to identify and avoid crashing into large objects such as cave walls, Boonman and Yovel say. The new discovery in fru...

Large moths need to hear better

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Bats orient themselves through echolocation, and they find their prey by emitting calls and then process the echoes reflected back to them from the prey. Small insects reflect small echo signals, and large insects reflect large sign...

When it's too noisy for bats to listen for their prey, they use echolocation to hunt instead

Academics : LA Times: Science

The fringe-lipped bat hunts by ear. The winged predator, found in South and Central America, eavesdrops on the male tungara frog’s mating call and decides on the moment to strike. When the time is right, the bat flies from its perch...

'Non-echolocating' fruit bats actually do echolocate, with wing clicks

Academics / General Science : ScienceDaily: Science Society

In a discovery that overturns conventional wisdom about bats, researchers have found that Old World fruit bats -- long classified as 'non-echolocating' -- actually do use a rudimentary form of echolocation. Perhaps most surprisingly...

First imagery from echolocation reveals new signals for hunting bats

Academics / General Science : ScienceDaily: Science Society

Scientists developed a new way to produce images from echolocation, uncovering a new set of cues available to bats and a new phenomenon of 'acoustic camouflage' available to prey.

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