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Storing more carbon in western Cascades forests could benefit some wildlife species, not others

Forest management policies that aim to store more carbon in the Pacific Northwest may benefit some wildlife species more than others.
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Northwest Forest Plan has unintended benefit - carbon sequestration

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Northwest Forest Plan enacted in 1993 was designed to conserve old-growth forests and protect species such as the northern spotted owl, but researchers conclude in a new study that it had another powerful and u...

Active forest management to reduce fire could help protect northern spotted owl

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The northern spotted owl, a threatened species in the Pacific Northwest, would actually benefit in the long run from active management of the forest lands that form its primary habitat and are increasingly vulnerab...

Law of unintended carbon consequences

Academics / General Science : Watts Up With That?

From Oregon State University Northwest Forest Plan has unintended benefit – carbon sequestration CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Northwest Forest Plan enacted in 1993 was designed to conserve old-growth forests and protect species such as the...

Shocker: burning trees release stored carbon

Academics / General Science : Watts Up With That?

From the Department of Obvious Science and the USDA Forest Service – Pacific Northwest Research Station, comes this shocking headline: Washington’s forests will lose stored carbon as area burned by wildfire increases Even small incr...

Washington's forests will lose stored carbon as area burned by wildfire increases

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Forests in the Pacific Northwest store more carbon than any other region in the United States, but our warming climate may undermine their storage potential. read more

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