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Genetic 'fossils' reveal long-term viral partnerships in grass

Defective viruses incorporated into grass genomes may adapt to form partnerships with other genome-incorporated viruses in order to complete their life cycle, according to a new PLOS Pathogens study. The findings suggest that partner viruses evolve in concert, enabling them to maintain their relationship over time.
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