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Deal or no deal—animals who assist with parenting may simply be playing the market

For centuries evolutionary biologists have been considering a difficult question: why do some animals 'choose' not to have children and instead help others rear their young? Researchers from Royal Holloway, University of London, with colleagues from the University of Sussex and the University of Exeter, have been studying wasps to try and find the answer.
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