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Plan 9 from PPNAS

[cat picture] Asher Meir points to this breathless news article and sends me a message, subject line “Fruit juice leads to 0.003 unit (!) increase in BMI”: “the study results showed that one daily 6- to 8-ounce serving increment of 100% fruit juice was associated with a small.003 unit increase in body mass index […] The post Plan 9 from PPNAS appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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