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Tick spit could save hearts and lives

Although ticks are generally thought of as being the spreaders of illness, they may actually be able to help save peoples' lives. According to a new study from the University of Oxford, proteins found in tick saliva could be used to treat a potentially fatal heart disease... Continue Reading Tick spit could save hearts and lives Category: Science Tags: Heart Disease Treatment University of
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