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Study: Climate Change To Wipe Out Half Of Ethiopia’s Coffee-Growing Area

The birthplace of coffee, Ethiopia, is likely to lose up to half of its total coffee-growing area by the end of the century as a result of anthropogenic climate change and its effects, according to a new study Study: Climate Change To Wipe Out Half Of Ethiopia’s Coffee-Growing Area was originally published on CleanTechnica. To read more from CleanTechnica, join over 50,000 other subscribers: Google+ | Email | Facebook | RSS | Twitter.
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