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Has Iceland Eliminated Down Syndrome Through Abortion?

A report by CBS News highlights a nearly 100 percent termination rate in the pregnancies of Icelandic women whose fetuses test positive for Down syndrome in genetic screenings, but some have mischaracterized this report.
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