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This week from AGU: New study details ocean's role in fourth-largest extinction

(American Geophysical Union) Extremely low oxygen levels in Earth's oceans could be responsible for extending the effects of a mass extinction that wiped out millions of species on Earth around 200 million years ago, according to a new study published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.
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