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Online campaign against invasive plants

Neophytes – invasive plants that are alien to the region – are a huge burden on the public purse. The ETH spin-off "In-Finitude" has set up a new online platform right on time for the growing season. This displays the locations of the invasive neophytes across Switzerland and offers support to landowners and local authorities in combating them.
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