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Energy dense foods may increase cancer risk regardless of obesity status

(Elsevier) While there is a proven link between obesity and certain types of cancer, less is known about how the ratio of energy to food weight, otherwise known as dietary energy density (DED), contributes to cancer risk. To find out, researchers looked at DED in the diets of post-menopausal women and discovered that consuming high DED foods was tied to a 10 percent increase in obesity-related cancer among normal weight women.
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