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What Can Scientists Actually Do With An Eclipse?

Solar eclipses are certainly one of the most striking astrophysical phenomena. The most important light of the day, the Sun, gets blacked out by the most important light of the night. But there's actually nothing weird or surprising about that -- sure, eclipses are rare, but with the Moon close and the Sun far away, sometimes one gets in the way of the other. But who cares? How is that dif
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