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Larvaceans provide a pathway for transporting microplastics into deep-sea food webs

Over the last decade, scientists have discovered tiny pieces of plastic in many ocean waters, and even in deep-sea mud. However, they know very little about how microplastics are transported within the ocean. A new paper by MBARI researchers in the journal Science Advances shows that filter-feeding animals called giant larvaceans can collect and consume microplastic particles in the deep sea.
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