Post Profile






How to photograph the eclipse with your iPhone (and how not to)

A total solar eclipse – the entire sun blocked by the passage of the moon – is one of the most awe-inspiring natural events you can experience. I travelled to Germany to view one in 1999, and I remember it vividly today. The light getting gradually dimmer and dimmer, a deep twilight and then the sudden and dramatic transition into total darkness. Monday will see America’s first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in almost a century.
read more

share

Related Posts


How to safely enjoy the 2017 solar eclipse, a buyer’s guide for normal people

Humor / odd : Kottke.org

On August 21, 2017 across the entire United States, the Moon will move in front of the Sun, partially blocking it from our view. For those on the path of totality, the Moon will entirely block out the Sun for more than 2 minutes. I’...

The total solar eclipse may break internet records — here's how web companies are preparing for the crush

Technology / Technology Industry News : Silicon Alley Insider

Experts think the total solar eclipse on August 21 may become the most-viewed event in human history. Record numbers of people are expected to photograph, share, and watch live video feeds of the eclipse online. However, telecommuni...

A Solar Eclipse Unlike Any You've Ever Seen

Genres / Sci Fi : io9

During a total solar eclipse, our view of the Sun's disk is blocked entirely by the Moon. The Sun's corona, however, remains very much in view – a roiling wreath of spellbinding atmospheric activity. Read more...

Don't Miss The Eclipse: Here Are Two Ways You Can Travel To See It For Free

House & Home / Interior Design : Apartment Therapy

On August 21 a total solar eclipse will be visible within a band across the entire United States. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon crosses between Earth and the sun, blocking out the view of the sun. June 8, 1918 — nearly a cent...

Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Your complete guide - CNET

Lifestyle / Productivity : CNET: How To

The moon will hide the sun on Aug. 21. Here's where to go, how to view it safely, why it happens and what Bigfoot has to do with a solar eclipse.

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC