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Scientists compare soil microbes in no-till, conventional tilling systems of Pacific Northwest farms

In recent decades, growers have increasingly been adopting no-till farming to reduce soil erosion and decrease fuel, labor, and inputs.
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Scientists compare soil microbes in no-till, conventional tilling systems of Pacific Northwest farms

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(American Phytopathological Society) Wheat growers of the inland Pacific Northwest have been slow to adopt no-till farming, in part because short-term residue accumulation can encourage fungal soil-borne disease outbreaks. But over ...

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