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Watching Animals Watch the Eclipse

On Monday, August 21, Elise Ricard, like millions of others across the United States, will stare at the sky for about ninety seconds to watch the moon fully eclipse the sun. Just before that, though, she's going to try to spend five minutes or so watching a squirrel. And afterwards, if her mind isn't too blown, she's going to find that same squirrel, and watch it again. We more or less know what people will get up to during the eclipse.
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