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Bats crash into windows because of a glitch with their ‘sonar’

Until bats get very close, their echolocation makes them “see” smooth surfaces like windows as gaps rather than as a solid material – with impactful results
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Sperm whales weigh up to 50 tons, and the smallest bat barely reaches a gram. Nevertheless, the two species share the same success story: They both have developed the ability to use echolocation -- a biological sonar -- for hunting....

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Only some bats and toothed whales rely on sophisticated echolocation, in which they emit sonar pulses and process returning echoes, to detect and track down small prey. Now, two new studies show that bats' and whales' remarkable abi...

Bats fail to detect smooth, vertical surfaces when they are in a rush

Academics / Biology : Physorg: Biology

Sometimes bats perceive a smooth, vertical surface as an open pathway, a dangerous error near buildings with glass facades, shown by injured or dead bats next to birds found underneath. The smooth surface reflects the echolocation c...

Bats crash into windows because of a glitch with their ‘sonar’

Academics / General Science : CultureLab

Until bats get very close, their echolocation makes them “see” smooth surfaces like windows as gaps rather than as a solid material – with impactful results

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