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Do we trust these data on political news consumption?

Mark Palko writes: The Monkey Cage just retweeted this but some of the numbers look funny. “This” is a paper, “The Myth of Partisan Selective Exposure: A Portrait of the Online Political News Audience,” by Jacob Nelson and James Webster, which who write: We explore observed online audience behavior data to present a portrait of […] The post Do we trust these data on political news consumption? appeared first on Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science.
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