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Cooperation driven by reciprocity, not conformity

From an evolutionary perspective, cooperating with others can yield benefits that increase chances of survival. But what are the conditions that motivate us to cooperate? New research suggests that reciprocity - cooperation under the assumption that we will receive benefits in return - outweighs our desire to conform with group norms when we're deciding whether to cooperate with someone.
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