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Australian Scientists Just Found A 3.7 Billion Year Old Living Fossil In Tasmania

Researchers were checking out an unusual peaty-limestone freshwater swamp in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area recently, when they discovered something pretty special. Living stromatolites - the 3.7 Billion year old, oldest evidence for life on Earth. Previously only found in extremely rare, highly specific salt water environments, this is also the first time they've been found in Tasmania.
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