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Researchers Identify Six Genes Driving Peanut Allergy Reactions

Mount Sinai researchers have identified six genes that activate hundreds of other genes in children experiencing severe allergic reactions to peanuts. This is the first study in human trials to identify genes driving acute peanut allergic reactions using a double-blind placebo-controlled approach with comprehensive sequencing of genes expressed before, during, and after they ingested peanut.
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